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Saturday, February 1, 2020

Advance Notice to February General Meeting



















Genealogical Society of Hispanic America – Southern California
General Meeting: Saturday, February 1, 2020  •  10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Southern California Genealogical Society Library, 417 Irving Dr., Burbank, California  (directions:  818-843-7247)
General Public Invited
What to do after you receive your DNA results:
Strategies and tools to maximize your genetic
genealogy success

• How to evaluate your DNA matches
• How to use the tools provided by the DNA testing companies
• How to use the tools provided by 3rd party companies
• How to maximize the visibility of your DNA results
• How to make your DNA results available to people who test with other DNA testing companies
• How to create a visual DNA profile of you and your family using chromosome painters, DNA Painter, and Visual Phasing
• How to use relative grouping tools
8– Should I upload my data to [GEDmatch]?
Presenter Dale Alsop is a graduate of the University of Utah (BS & MBA); with classes at UCLA (Statistics); and the California State University - Fullerton (Biology, Anthropology, Genetics). Other institutional experience: Institute for Genetic Genealogy (2017-2018) and the Virtual Institute of Genealogical Research
He has attended dozens of classes and seminars from such industry luminaries as CeCe Moore, Blaine Bettinger, Colleen Fitzpatrick, and Ugo Perego. He is a traditional genealogist for 35 years and has taught the subject for 15 years. His first DNA test was from Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation in 2004. He has since tested with Ancestry, 23andMe, MyHeritage, FamilyTreeDNA, and National Geographic. He has taught Genetic Genealogy since 2014
10 am           Coffee & Setup
  10:30 am      GSHA Southern California Announcements
11 - 12 pm   Dale Alsop
12 pm           Pizza lunch. Two pieces of pizza and soda for $7.
1:30 pm        Door Prize Drawing. An eclectic array of prizes, many geared to genealogy. Drawing Tickets $1/each, 6 tickets for $5 or 12 tickets for $10
For meeting details, contact Cathy Romero at cath.romero@sbcglobal.net or 626-485-2276.
FOLLOW US ON:  GSHA SC websites:   www.gsha-sc.org    •    gsha-sc.blogspot.com
Facebook: Genealogical Society of Hispanic America - Southern California
2020 General Meetings:  1st Saturday in February, May, August, and December.
GSHA SC’s general meeting programs are generously supported by Educator Paul J. Gomez

Wednesday, January 15, 2020

DNA supplied by public to trace their ancestry should be available to police, according to majority of Britons

DNA that the public supply to private firms to trace their ancestry should be available to police investigating crimes, says a majority of Britons. Some 55 per cent of people believe that the police should be able to access the DNA records of people held in private databases, according to a YouGov poll of 1,621 adults.

About one in 20 (five per cent) of Britons, equivalent to around 2.5 million people, told researchers they had used a DNA test kit, with a further eight per cent, saying they planned to do so in the future.

Three quarters of those who used the kit did so to learn about their ancestry and family history. A further eight per cent did so to find out about potential diseases they could suffer.

A further 11 per cent underwent DNA paternity tests.

DNA testing companies have refused to reveal the genetic information of customers although there have been rare cases where police have used open-source databases to narrow a list of suspects.

Police can only retain indefinitely the DNA of people convicted of a range of 400 offences from murder to burglary and can hold for a limited period the DNA of people charged or arrested but not convicted before it has to be deleted.

Almost 5.4 million individuals’ DNA profiles are currently on the national police database which would mean more than 60 million people are not.

Despite privacy controversies over the police’s increasing use of new technologies such as facial recognition cameras, the public appear relaxed about the idea of third parties having access to people’s DNA where it could help solve a crime.

To read more of this article in The Telegraph hit here 

Friday, January 10, 2020

DNA tests and family matters

It's been a long and winding road to this family reunion. Amidst the food and fun, brother and sister Richard and Sara Reibman are meeting a relative named Tom Johnson for the very first time.

And this is no distant relative; Johnson and the Reibmans have discovered they are siblings. "It was just shocking, awesome," Johnson told correspondent Rita Braver.

It all began when the Reibmans' cousin, Susan Goff, did a DNA test and found that someone named Thomas Edgar Johnson, Jr. seemed to be her first cousin. "I initially thought that's a mistake, because I know all my first cousins," she said.

Goff, who is partially of Eastern European Jewish decent, reached out to Johnson, who was raised a fundamentalist Christian, and already puzzling over his DNA results. "It said that I was a descendant of Eastern European Jews, and French! That's not at all in my family that I knew," he said.

Soon, Goff figured out that Johnson had been born in Dearborn, Michigan. She knew that Sara and Richard's brother, Herbert, who died ten years ago, had been born there, too, as it turned out, in the same hospital within hours of Tom. The day was December 7, 1941, Pearl Harbor Day. And Johnson suddenly realized that, in what had to be nationwide chaos, he and Herbert Reibman may have been switched at birth.

"I also was in kind of shock at that time, too, realizing that maybe I had overturned a rock that was pretty surprising to me," said Johnson, "that in fact, I did have a different mother and father than I grew up with."

Sara Reibman took a DNA test, too, and confirmed that Tom is her brother.

How shocked was she? "I thought, that explains a lot, because Herbie, the brother who was switched, was just so different than we were," she said. "And we always kinda laughed about it. It was kind of a joke, you know – where'd he come from?"

Richard Reibman calls the discovery bittersweet. He says they loved their brother Herbert who died without learning the real story. He also feels there's reason to be happy: "It certainly will enrich my life going forward. I think for Tom it's much more difficult. Because he didn't grow up with his biological parents, although he grew up in a loving family. but it's different for him."

Johnson said, "I have an aunt who is only three years older than me, and I talked to her, and she said, 'You'll always be our family …'" he started choking up. "But I'm really looking forward to knowing more about my real family. It's really a joy for me."

Though many of the commercials for DNA kits make it sound like taking the test might yield some fun surprises about your heritage, in fact a recent survey shows that more than a quarter of those who use mail-in DNA tests end up learning about close relatives that they didn't know about.

And it's not always happy news.

Catherine St. Clair said, "It was May of 2017 when the floor fell out from under me."

That was the day she learned "devastating news": that she didn't share DNA with the only father she'd ever known. "What I found out was that my mother worked for a few months at this store that my biological father owned, and I was conceived at that time. I was raised as my dad's child along with my siblings, and nobody knew."

With both the parents who raised her, and her birth father, dead, St. Clair had no one to ask what happened. Feeling isolated, she started an online support group called NPE Friends Fellowship for others in similar situations.

NPE stands for Not Parent Expected. And before she knew it, St. Clair said, "we had 6,000 members."

They even have meet-ups, where members talk about issues like the shock of finding out that their biological father was not who they thought. Paulette Bethel said, "Now I realize I was feeling betrayal. My mother had this secret."

Braver asked another member, Bradley Hall, "Were you able to talk to your mother about this?"

"She's unapproachable about the subject," he replied.

Getting emotional, Tamera Brooks said the hardest part was that the dad who raised her had no idea she wasn't his: "I didn't want to tell him. At this point he was sick and I didn't wanna upset him, you know?"

At DNA testing companies, like 23&me, so many calls come in from people who make shocking discoveries about their families, that, as they demonstrated for Braver, employees get special training in how to handle delicate situations: "Just let them some time to process that on the phone, 'cause sometimes people call in just wanting to vent or to have someone listen," said Madeline Lynch.

The company just launched a new webpage aimed at helping people cope with "unexpected relationships".

And there are a lot of happy endings. Take the story of young boxer Vidal Rivera, and James Inge Sr. and Jr.

Last year James Jr. took a DNA test to learn more about his heritage, and was surprised when someone he'd never heard of seemed to be a close match. So, he called Ancestry.com, the testing company he'd used:

"I talked to their customer service person. And he's funny, 'cause he's like, 'Oh, congratulations. This is your brother!' So, I'm like, 'OK.'"

Braver asked, "Did you call him first, or did you call your dad first?"

"I talked to my dad, he was feeling kinda like, 'What?' Kind like misty area of mindset."

Braver asked James Sr., "Did you have a glimmer?"

"Couldn't remember nothing," he replied. "And I felt really bad 'cause I didn't remember – 27 years ago? That was the '80s, that was good times! Don't remember that! Couldn't remember, like, seriously couldn't remember."

But it was just what his newly-found son had been dreaming of. He'd taken a DNA test for one reason only: "Like a lucky shot in the dark and see what I've always been looking for, see if, you know, I happened to find my dad on there."

Braver said, "Had you ever asked your mom who your dad was?"

"A million times," he said..

"And she didn't wanna talk about it?"

"Yeah, at times she didn't wanna talk about it. I got different answers. Things of that nature. So, I just knew I couldn't keep knocking on that door."

But now these three men say they have formed a bond which will never break, and it all started with a simple DNA test.

Braver asked, "What would you say to people who are worried about doing this? What would your response be?"

Vidal replied, "You just have to get your feet wet and do it. And you can't be afraid of it, and embrace whatever you get, because, you know, it's gonna happen. It's just gonna happen in its own way."


To watch it hit here

Monday, January 6, 2020

DNA supplied by public to trace their ancestry should be available to police, according to majority of Britons

DNA that the public supply to private firms to trace their ancestry should be available to police investigating crimes, says a majority of Britons.

Some 55 per cent of people believe that the police should be able to access the DNA records of people held in private databases, according to a YouGov poll of 1,621 adults.

About one in 20 (five per cent) of Britons, equivalent to around 2.5 million people, told researchers they had used a DNA test kit, with a further eight per cent, saying they planned to do so in the future.

Three quarters of those who used the kit did so to learn about their ancestry and family history. A further eight per cent did so to find out about potential diseases they could suffer.

A further 11 per cent underwent DNA paternity tests.
DNA testing companies have refused to reveal the genetic information of customers although there have been rare cases where police have used open-source databases to narrow a list of suspects.

Police can only retain indefinitely the DNA of people convicted of a range of 400 offences from murder to burglary and can hold for a limited period the DNA of people charged or arrested but not convicted before it has to be deleted.

Almost 5.4 million individuals’ DNA profiles are currently on the national police database which would mean more than 60 million people are not.

Despite privacy controversies over the police’s increasing use of new technologies such as facial recognition cameras, the public appear relaxed about the idea of third parties having access to people’s DNA where it could help solve a crime.

While 55 per cent believe it should be open to police, 54 per cent backed the counter terror services having access and 52 per cent backed health services.

However, more than eight in ten (82 per cent) opposed private companies being granted access, with only three per cent in favour.

To read more of this article hit here

Hispanic Tuesday and Thursday Announcement

Please take advantage of our expert researchers in helping you restart your research or getting you off the couch in starting your journey in genealogy. Please note that some of these individuals speak and read Spanish.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

Battle of Rio San Gabriel Reenactment Saturday January 11th, 2020



















Saturday, January 11 • 11 am to 4 pm
Montebello Historical Society: "Battle of Rio San Gabriel - Annual Reenactment" The Battle of Rio San Gabriel was part of the California campaign of the Mexican-American War (1846-1848). The conflict took place on January 8, 1847, on the sites of present-day Montebello and Pico Rivera. U.S. scouts had discovered the Mexican militia's position at a key ford along the San Gabriel River. Commodore Robert F. Stockton and Army General Stephen W. Kearny planned a crossing for the next day, but this proved to be especially difficult when the Mexican general, Jose Maria Flores, contested the crossing from his position on the heights across the river as U.S. forces entered the waterway. You are invited to see the battle reenacted at Juan Matias Sanchez Adobe Museum, 946 North Adobe Ave., Montebello, 90640. MHS's event will feature uniformed American and Californio reenactors, living-history period music, vintage dancers, and audience-participation fandango dancing. • Cost: Free

Monday, December 30, 2019

The Trujillo Adobe and Spanish Town Heritage Foundation January 5th 1:30 PM Riverside, CA

Inlandia Institute invites you to celebrate and learn about our area’s Native American connection and our genízaro pioneers, Sunday, January 5, 1:30 pm at the Culver Center.

Find out about the life and times of genízaro pioneers of La Placita/Agua Mansa, Alta California, Mexico, known today as Riverside and Colton, California, USA!

Who were genízaros? Why did they come to Alta California? What were they hoping to accomplish? How did they get here? Why here and not someplace else?

Join us with special guests: UCR Professor Emeritus Dr. Carlos Cortés and La Placita Descendants Leonard Trujillo and Nancy Melendez.

Learn about the Trujillo Adobe historical site, plans to restore it, and re-ignite the old Spanish Town settlement. Jot down your questions and join this illuminating conversation!

Dr. Carlos Cortés is a nationally known and award-winning author, teacher, consultant and speaker on a wide variety of issues related to diversity, multiculturalism, the impact of media, and cross-cultural understanding. He is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of California, Riverside. He served as the Creative/Cultural Advisor for Nickelodeon's award-winning children's television series, "Dora the Explorer" and "Go, Diego, Go!”

"Sometimes we become so distracted by national and world events that we overlook the historical dramas in our own backyard. It's nice to be able to participate in an event that brings our own local history to life." —Carlos Cortés

Leonard Trujillo is a direct descendant and a third great grandson of Lorenzo Trujillo & Maria Dolores Archuleta who settled in the San Bernardino Valley of Alta California in the early 1840’s. As a direct male descendant, Leonard was able to confirm through Y-DNA testing the Indigenous ancestry of his Trujillo family line in New Mexico. Freed by retirement, Leonard volunteers to help individuals trace their ancestry. He currently serves as president of the Southern California Chapter of the Genealogical Society of Hispanic America.

“And there were the intriguing stories of my paternal ancestors from New Mexico who established the first settlement in Riverside, California in the 1840’s and were described as Native Americans.” —Leonard Trujillo